Sarcasm and other things face to face

White rhinoceros

Rhodes croppedBy Stephen Rhodes

I’ve discovered sarcasm doesn’t always play well in email, or on Twitter. It’s a waste of time in a text message. Duh!!!! works but it doesn’t really have much depth. To really express my true feelings I have to be face to face with someone and that seems to happen less and less these days.

The world is flying by and email, text messaging, status updates and tweets have replaced even the telephone as front line communication. Hardly anyone wants to pick up the telephone anymore. Are we afraid, or just so busy we don’t want to risk the pleasantries of social intercourse running longer than it takes to tweet?

I prefer telephone over email, although I admit email is often a time saver. Voice and inflection are important in conversation. Moods are easier to detect. Instructions are easier to follow and more certain.

Email is fast and leaves the impression that you are right on top of something, when in fact it’s often used as a delaying tactic. I know. I have done it.

You can’t convey passion in email like you can on a telephone or better yet , in person.

Twitter and Facebook are great communication tools but they can not replace facetime with a client. Face to face is the place where business is consumated. I have never worked with a client I haven’t met face to face. I can’t imagine I ever will until until I can project a hologram into their virtual office like Obi Wan Kenobi.

Body language is also part of the dance of commerce. Facial expressions, nervous ticks all help you better understand the needs wants and even anxieties of your client. And how will they understand your sarcasm if you can’t wink, wink, nudge, nudge?

Whatever rapport you build takes on a new dimension when you meet face to face. It’s the best way to build strong relationships with you clients.

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Filed under Communications, Stephen Rhodes

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