Tag Archives: influencers

Would You Buy from You?

JBMG_5500aBy Jeff Bowman

Having been involved in sales and sales training for the last 30 years, I have seen some major changes in both buyer habits and sales skills usage. The economy, the type of product or service you are selling, the demographic you are selling too and the cost of the product are among the many factors that affect the type of sales interaction that should take place. Sales training continually ranks very low on the list of business expenditures, however it is probably the most important factor in the success of your business, and one of the most tracked and analyzed areas of measurable data a company has.

I have put together a list of the 5 most common mistakes a salesperson will make and how to avoid them in future interactions. They are certainly not a replacement for continual and effective sales training, however they might resonate with you on a recent lost sale.

1. Calling on the wrong person is something we have all done, and it results in a waste of time and effort on your part. I used to call on whoever I could reach at the company, or the person I met at the networking event, and found that it was very counterproductive. Sure, we can consider those people “influencers” however simply asking the question, “are you the decision maker?” or “will you be the person signing off on this?” will get you further.

2. Relying too much on the web and social media to sell for you is a trap that a great number of companies are still trying to get out of. All we hear about today is how we need to be online. Online is no substitute for your direct selling skills. Online tools are an important part of your marketing mix designed to create awareness and help the potential client move towards contacting you.

iStock_000016561283Small3. Dropping your price to meet the customer’s expectation of value is a killer. By dropping your price, you have simply created a new selling point for future negotiations. Hold your price; increase the perceived value by adding something additional on, an extra month of coverage, free delivery, 30 days additional warranty, some small inexpensive accessory.

4. Selling an “opportunity” is far different from selling to a “need” and will usually result in rejection. Don’t assume that because you have uncovered an opportunity for a sale that the client has a definitive need at this point in time and has to purchase from you. For every solid sale potential there are thousands of tire kickers.

5. Overselling or continuing the sales pitch just because you are uncomfortable with the pregnant pause to allow a prospect to consider the options and come to a decision, could end the interaction prematurely. Uncover the need, assist the prospect by suggesting a product, describe the features it has that satisfy the need as well as identify the benefits to them. STOP. Let them consider it and watch for a buying signal!

All of these mistakes are preventable, sales training to continually upgrade skills and competency levels are an investment every business needs to consider. These skills are tools of the trade. Are your skills up to par, and more importantly, would you buy from you?

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Filed under Customer Service, Jeff Bowman, Sales, Training and Development, Uncategorized

Orienteering through Your Business.

JBMG_5500aBy Jeff Bowman

“Unless we progress, we regress” said Dwight D. Eisenhower back in 1959. All our business strategies when combined should be leading us in a progressive pattern. Yes, times have been difficult over the last several years, however that doesn’t mean a business can’t be moving forward, planning ahead, and planting the seeds for future expansion and growth. After the first six months of the year it is time to settle in and review some of the key things that might affect your strategic plan.

I tend to focus on three key areas of a business when looking at where we have come from and the future direction we need to take.  We don’t have a Business GPS that will pinpoint our final destination and tell us step by step which turns  to take.  We do however have our experiential compass that can show us the general direction, based on our past movements and the trails we have marked to get to the current position. At times when we feel a little lost however there are many tools at hand that we can utilize to get back on course. A strong business strategy serves as the basis for all future actions, and from time to time these might need to be tweaked or altered a little, a few degrees here and there.

Consider the following three “influencers” to determine if it is the plan that needs some alterations or is it tools and support you have in place to get you where you want to be. First, what if any landscape changes are you encountering on your journey? Has competition changed?  Has the marketplace grown or retracted? Depending on what your product or service is, has consumer attitude changed?  Is your brand more or less recognized?  What is being said about you in social media circles? These all have an impact on your business, just the same as the landscape would if you were hiking through dense forest, thick marsh, inclement weather conditions etc. We always plan for these events, however it is the smart business person that recognizes theses changes and adapts. Clipboard01

Second, is everyone on your team paddling in the same direction? It may be time to review your goals and objectives with the entire team.  Explain your progress, and ask for feedback on possible alternatives to past actions that did not get you the results you were hoping for.

Finally, has the leader in the group demonstrated the skills and competencies that make them a good leader? Flexibility, positive thinking, the ability to manage internal conflict, foresight and most importantly do they delegate authority? When the business is doing well, everyone is happy, however throw a few missed objectives, a string of poor revenue performing months or some other distraction into the mix and the added pressures can have ill effects on the employees and the leaders of the organization. Most of us have seen in our business lives the type of leader who owns the successes but positions the failures on others.

Progress needs to be monitored to ensure that we are advancing and not just going in circles.  The six month mark is an excellent time to see exactly what your coordinates are!

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Filed under Jeff Bowman, Managing, Sales, Strategic Planning, Training and Development